University of Wisconsin-Madison Physical Sciences Lab

Archive for January, 2014

IceCube is 2013’s Breakthrough of the Year

Friday, January 31st, 2014

IceCube’s discovery of cosmic neutrinos was Physics World magazine’s “2013 Breakthrough of the Year.” IceCube is the world’s largest telescope; consisting of 5,600 optical modules, which detect neutrinos, that are frozen in the ice at the South Pole. Twenty cosmic neutrinos were detected, and interacted with the telescope, enabling IceCube researchers to determine the minimum energy of these neutrinos to within 15%.

Read the article.

New PSL Newsletter

Friday, January 17th, 2014

  • PSL’s Expertise Reaches Beyond Research

    Once again PSL is at the South Pole, but this season it is something all new, the project involves civil engineering and the customer is Lockheed Martin. After an unexpected power outage due to generator issues, the water supply pump in the rod well would not restart leaving the station and its population without a source for water.

  • Large Hadron Collider Updates are Underway

    The Large Hadron Collider at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) near Geneva, Switzerland is shut down for possibly two years, but that does not mean that work has stopped. In fact it is teaming with engineers, technicians and scientists.

  • In the Works, the Future’s Massive Neutrino Detector

    Some of the world’s top physicists are coming together to help create a giant neutrino detector. A high-intensity neutrino beam will project 800 miles from Fermilab in Batavia, Illinois to the detector located in a mine in Lead, SD.

  • Working Together for Research: IDDO and PSL

    One of their drills, that is in high demand is their 4-Inch Electromechanical Drill system or as it is referred to the agile drill. This easily mobile drill is used for projects to recover high quality ice core analysis. IDDO contacted PSL with work for the new barrels of this drill.

  • Finding, Testing and Helping Solve Problems

    The PSL engineering team that was heading to the South Pole made a request for a camera needed for the Lockheed Martin project. The list of requirements was long.

  • Designing a Precision Height Gauge for More Accurate Results

    Dr. Carol Mitchell’s research requires taking a measurement with an ultrasonic sensor in each of the cells of six-cell culture plates. In order to get consistent results the operator must lower the sensor to the same depth, within a few thousandths of an inch, into each cell. She asked if PSL could help design some equipment to assist with this job.